author_facet Buchanan, Brian P.
Auerbach, Daniel A.
McManamay, Ryan A.
Taylor, Jason M.
Flecker, Alexander S.
Archibald, Josephine A.
Fuka, Daniel R.
Walter, M. Todd
Buchanan, Brian P.
Auerbach, Daniel A.
McManamay, Ryan A.
Taylor, Jason M.
Flecker, Alexander S.
Archibald, Josephine A.
Fuka, Daniel R.
Walter, M. Todd
author Buchanan, Brian P.
Auerbach, Daniel A.
McManamay, Ryan A.
Taylor, Jason M.
Flecker, Alexander S.
Archibald, Josephine A.
Fuka, Daniel R.
Walter, M. Todd
spellingShingle Buchanan, Brian P.
Auerbach, Daniel A.
McManamay, Ryan A.
Taylor, Jason M.
Flecker, Alexander S.
Archibald, Josephine A.
Fuka, Daniel R.
Walter, M. Todd
Ecological Applications
Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
author_sort buchanan, brian p.
spelling Buchanan, Brian P. Auerbach, Daniel A. McManamay, Ryan A. Taylor, Jason M. Flecker, Alexander S. Archibald, Josephine A. Fuka, Daniel R. Walter, M. Todd 1051-0761 Ecological Society of America http://www.jstor.org/stable/44132580 <p>Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate how water withdrawals for unconventional natural gas development may impact aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we studied current patterns of hydrologie alteration in the Marcellus Shale region and related the estimated flow alteration to fish community measures. We then used these empirical flow-ecology relationships to evaluate alternative surface water withdrawals and environmental flow rules. Reduced high-flow magnitude, dampened rates of change, and increased low-flow magnitudes were apparent regionally, but changes in many of the flow metrics likely to be sensitive to withdrawals also showed substantial regional variation. Fish community measures were significantly related to flow alteration, including declines in species richness with diminished annual runoff, winter low-flow, and summer median-flow. In addition, the relative abundance of intolerant taxa decreased with reduced winter high-flow and increased flow constancy, while fluvial specialist species decreased with reduced winter and annual flows. Stream size strongly mediated both the impact of withdrawal scenarios and the protection afforded by environmental flow standards. Under the most intense withdrawal scenario, 75% of reference headwaters and creeks (drainage areas &lt;99 km²) experienced at least 78% reduction in summer flow, whereas little change was predicted for larger rivers. Moreover, the least intense withdrawal scenario still reduced summer flows by at least 21% for 50% of headwaters and creeks. The observed 90th quantile flow-ecology relationships indicate that such alteration could reduce species richness by 23% or more. Seasonally varying environmental flow standards and high fixed minimum flows protected the most streams from hydrologie alteration, but common minimum flow standards left numerous locations vulnerable to substantial flow alteration. This study clarifies how additional water demands in the region may adversely affect freshwater biological integrity. The results make clear that policies to limit or prevent water withdrawals from smaller streams can reduce the risk of ecosystem impairment.</p> Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale Ecological Applications
facet_avail Online
format ElectronicArticle
fullrecord blob:ai-55-aHR0cDovL3d3dy5qc3Rvci5vcmcvc3RhYmxlLzQ0MTMyNTgw
id ai-55-aHR0cDovL3d3dy5qc3Rvci5vcmcvc3RhYmxlLzQ0MTMyNTgw
institution DE-15
DE-14
DE-Ch1
DE-D13
imprint Ecological Society of America, 2017
imprint_str_mv Ecological Society of America, 2017
issn 1051-0761
issn_str_mv 1051-0761
language English
mega_collection JSTOR Life Sciences Archive
JSTOR Arts & Sciences I Archive
match_str buchanan2017environmentalflowsinthecontextofunconventionalnaturalgasdevelopmentinthemarcellusshale
publishDateSort 2017
publisher Ecological Society of America
recordtype ai
record_format ai
series Ecological Applications
source_id 55
title Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_unstemmed Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_full Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_fullStr Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_full_unstemmed Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_short Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_sort environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the marcellus shale
url http://www.jstor.org/stable/44132580
publishDate 2017
physical 37-55
description <p>Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate how water withdrawals for unconventional natural gas development may impact aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we studied current patterns of hydrologie alteration in the Marcellus Shale region and related the estimated flow alteration to fish community measures. We then used these empirical flow-ecology relationships to evaluate alternative surface water withdrawals and environmental flow rules. Reduced high-flow magnitude, dampened rates of change, and increased low-flow magnitudes were apparent regionally, but changes in many of the flow metrics likely to be sensitive to withdrawals also showed substantial regional variation. Fish community measures were significantly related to flow alteration, including declines in species richness with diminished annual runoff, winter low-flow, and summer median-flow. In addition, the relative abundance of intolerant taxa decreased with reduced winter high-flow and increased flow constancy, while fluvial specialist species decreased with reduced winter and annual flows. Stream size strongly mediated both the impact of withdrawal scenarios and the protection afforded by environmental flow standards. Under the most intense withdrawal scenario, 75% of reference headwaters and creeks (drainage areas &lt;99 km²) experienced at least 78% reduction in summer flow, whereas little change was predicted for larger rivers. Moreover, the least intense withdrawal scenario still reduced summer flows by at least 21% for 50% of headwaters and creeks. The observed 90th quantile flow-ecology relationships indicate that such alteration could reduce species richness by 23% or more. Seasonally varying environmental flow standards and high fixed minimum flows protected the most streams from hydrologie alteration, but common minimum flow standards left numerous locations vulnerable to substantial flow alteration. This study clarifies how additional water demands in the region may adversely affect freshwater biological integrity. The results make clear that policies to limit or prevent water withdrawals from smaller streams can reduce the risk of ecosystem impairment.</p>
collection sid-55-col-jstorlife
sid-55-col-jstoras1
container_issue 1
container_start_page 37
container_title Ecological Applications
container_volume 27
format_de105 Article, E-Article
format_de14 Article, E-Article
format_de15 Article, E-Article
format_de520 Article, E-Article
format_de540 Article, E-Article
format_dech1 Article, E-Article
format_ded117 Article, E-Article
format_degla1 E-Article
format_del152 Buch
format_del189 Article, E-Article
format_dezi4 Article
format_dezwi2 Article, E-Article
format_finc Article, E-Article
format_nrw Article, E-Article
_version_ 1792365039113469959
geogr_code not assigned
last_indexed 2024-03-01T22:34:46.226Z
geogr_code_person not assigned
openURL url_ver=Z39.88-2004&ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&ctx_enc=info%3Aofi%2Fenc%3AUTF-8&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2Fvufind.svn.sourceforge.net%3Agenerator&rft.title=Environmental+flows+in+the+context+of+unconventional+natural+gas+development+in+the+Marcellus+Shale&rft.date=2017-01-01&genre=article&issn=1051-0761&volume=27&issue=1&spage=37&epage=55&pages=37-55&jtitle=Ecological+Applications&atitle=Environmental+flows+in+the+context+of+unconventional+natural+gas+development+in+the+Marcellus+Shale&aulast=Walter&aufirst=M.+Todd&rft.language%5B0%5D=eng
SOLR
_version_ 1792365039113469959
author Buchanan, Brian P., Auerbach, Daniel A., McManamay, Ryan A., Taylor, Jason M., Flecker, Alexander S., Archibald, Josephine A., Fuka, Daniel R., Walter, M. Todd
author_facet Buchanan, Brian P., Auerbach, Daniel A., McManamay, Ryan A., Taylor, Jason M., Flecker, Alexander S., Archibald, Josephine A., Fuka, Daniel R., Walter, M. Todd, Buchanan, Brian P., Auerbach, Daniel A., McManamay, Ryan A., Taylor, Jason M., Flecker, Alexander S., Archibald, Josephine A., Fuka, Daniel R., Walter, M. Todd
author_sort buchanan, brian p.
collection sid-55-col-jstorlife, sid-55-col-jstoras1
container_issue 1
container_start_page 37
container_title Ecological Applications
container_volume 27
description <p>Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate how water withdrawals for unconventional natural gas development may impact aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we studied current patterns of hydrologie alteration in the Marcellus Shale region and related the estimated flow alteration to fish community measures. We then used these empirical flow-ecology relationships to evaluate alternative surface water withdrawals and environmental flow rules. Reduced high-flow magnitude, dampened rates of change, and increased low-flow magnitudes were apparent regionally, but changes in many of the flow metrics likely to be sensitive to withdrawals also showed substantial regional variation. Fish community measures were significantly related to flow alteration, including declines in species richness with diminished annual runoff, winter low-flow, and summer median-flow. In addition, the relative abundance of intolerant taxa decreased with reduced winter high-flow and increased flow constancy, while fluvial specialist species decreased with reduced winter and annual flows. Stream size strongly mediated both the impact of withdrawal scenarios and the protection afforded by environmental flow standards. Under the most intense withdrawal scenario, 75% of reference headwaters and creeks (drainage areas &lt;99 km²) experienced at least 78% reduction in summer flow, whereas little change was predicted for larger rivers. Moreover, the least intense withdrawal scenario still reduced summer flows by at least 21% for 50% of headwaters and creeks. The observed 90th quantile flow-ecology relationships indicate that such alteration could reduce species richness by 23% or more. Seasonally varying environmental flow standards and high fixed minimum flows protected the most streams from hydrologie alteration, but common minimum flow standards left numerous locations vulnerable to substantial flow alteration. This study clarifies how additional water demands in the region may adversely affect freshwater biological integrity. The results make clear that policies to limit or prevent water withdrawals from smaller streams can reduce the risk of ecosystem impairment.</p>
facet_avail Online
format ElectronicArticle
format_de105 Article, E-Article
format_de14 Article, E-Article
format_de15 Article, E-Article
format_de520 Article, E-Article
format_de540 Article, E-Article
format_dech1 Article, E-Article
format_ded117 Article, E-Article
format_degla1 E-Article
format_del152 Buch
format_del189 Article, E-Article
format_dezi4 Article
format_dezwi2 Article, E-Article
format_finc Article, E-Article
format_nrw Article, E-Article
geogr_code not assigned
geogr_code_person not assigned
id ai-55-aHR0cDovL3d3dy5qc3Rvci5vcmcvc3RhYmxlLzQ0MTMyNTgw
imprint Ecological Society of America, 2017
imprint_str_mv Ecological Society of America, 2017
institution DE-15, DE-14, DE-Ch1, DE-D13
issn 1051-0761
issn_str_mv 1051-0761
language English
last_indexed 2024-03-01T22:34:46.226Z
match_str buchanan2017environmentalflowsinthecontextofunconventionalnaturalgasdevelopmentinthemarcellusshale
mega_collection JSTOR Life Sciences Archive, JSTOR Arts & Sciences I Archive
physical 37-55
publishDate 2017
publishDateSort 2017
publisher Ecological Society of America
record_format ai
recordtype ai
series Ecological Applications
source_id 55
spelling Buchanan, Brian P. Auerbach, Daniel A. McManamay, Ryan A. Taylor, Jason M. Flecker, Alexander S. Archibald, Josephine A. Fuka, Daniel R. Walter, M. Todd 1051-0761 Ecological Society of America http://www.jstor.org/stable/44132580 <p>Quantitative flow-ecology relationships are needed to evaluate how water withdrawals for unconventional natural gas development may impact aquatic ecosystems. Addressing this need, we studied current patterns of hydrologie alteration in the Marcellus Shale region and related the estimated flow alteration to fish community measures. We then used these empirical flow-ecology relationships to evaluate alternative surface water withdrawals and environmental flow rules. Reduced high-flow magnitude, dampened rates of change, and increased low-flow magnitudes were apparent regionally, but changes in many of the flow metrics likely to be sensitive to withdrawals also showed substantial regional variation. Fish community measures were significantly related to flow alteration, including declines in species richness with diminished annual runoff, winter low-flow, and summer median-flow. In addition, the relative abundance of intolerant taxa decreased with reduced winter high-flow and increased flow constancy, while fluvial specialist species decreased with reduced winter and annual flows. Stream size strongly mediated both the impact of withdrawal scenarios and the protection afforded by environmental flow standards. Under the most intense withdrawal scenario, 75% of reference headwaters and creeks (drainage areas &lt;99 km²) experienced at least 78% reduction in summer flow, whereas little change was predicted for larger rivers. Moreover, the least intense withdrawal scenario still reduced summer flows by at least 21% for 50% of headwaters and creeks. The observed 90th quantile flow-ecology relationships indicate that such alteration could reduce species richness by 23% or more. Seasonally varying environmental flow standards and high fixed minimum flows protected the most streams from hydrologie alteration, but common minimum flow standards left numerous locations vulnerable to substantial flow alteration. This study clarifies how additional water demands in the region may adversely affect freshwater biological integrity. The results make clear that policies to limit or prevent water withdrawals from smaller streams can reduce the risk of ecosystem impairment.</p> Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale Ecological Applications
spellingShingle Buchanan, Brian P., Auerbach, Daniel A., McManamay, Ryan A., Taylor, Jason M., Flecker, Alexander S., Archibald, Josephine A., Fuka, Daniel R., Walter, M. Todd, Ecological Applications, Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_full Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_fullStr Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_full_unstemmed Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_short Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
title_sort environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the marcellus shale
title_unstemmed Environmental flows in the context of unconventional natural gas development in the Marcellus Shale
url http://www.jstor.org/stable/44132580