author_facet Weaver, Timothy D.
Klein, Richard G.
Weaver, Timothy D.
Klein, Richard G.
author Weaver, Timothy D.
Klein, Richard G.
spellingShingle Weaver, Timothy D.
Klein, Richard G.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology
Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature
author_sort weaver, timothy d.
spelling Weaver, Timothy D. Klein, Richard G. 0027-8424 National Academy of Sciences Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature https://www.jstor.org/stable/40485014 <p>A procedure is outlined for distinguishing among competing hypotheses for fossil morphology and then used to evaluate current views on the meaning of Neandertal skeletal morphology. Three explanations have dominated debates about the meaning of Neandertal cranial features: climatic adaptation, anterior dental loading, and genetic drift. Neither climatic adaptation nor anterior dental loading are well supported, but genetic drift is consistent with the available evidence. Climatic adaptation and activity patterns are the most discussed explanations for Neandertal postcranial features. Robust empirical relationships between climate and body form in extant humans and other endotherms currently make climatic adaptation the most plausible explanation for the wide bodies and relatively short limbs of Neandertals, and many additional postcranial features are likely secondary consequences of these overall skeletal proportions. Activity patterns may explain certain Neandertal postcranial features, but unlike the situation for climate, relationships in extant humans between morphology and activities are typically not well established. For both the cranium and the postcranium, changes in diet or activity patterns may underlie why Neandertals and Pleistocene modern humans tend to be more robust than Holocene humans.</p> The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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description <p>A procedure is outlined for distinguishing among competing hypotheses for fossil morphology and then used to evaluate current views on the meaning of Neandertal skeletal morphology. Three explanations have dominated debates about the meaning of Neandertal cranial features: climatic adaptation, anterior dental loading, and genetic drift. Neither climatic adaptation nor anterior dental loading are well supported, but genetic drift is consistent with the available evidence. Climatic adaptation and activity patterns are the most discussed explanations for Neandertal postcranial features. Robust empirical relationships between climate and body form in extant humans and other endotherms currently make climatic adaptation the most plausible explanation for the wide bodies and relatively short limbs of Neandertals, and many additional postcranial features are likely secondary consequences of these overall skeletal proportions. Activity patterns may explain certain Neandertal postcranial features, but unlike the situation for climate, relationships in extant humans between morphology and activities are typically not well established. For both the cranium and the postcranium, changes in diet or activity patterns may underlie why Neandertals and Pleistocene modern humans tend to be more robust than Holocene humans.</p>
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spelling Weaver, Timothy D. Klein, Richard G. 0027-8424 National Academy of Sciences Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature https://www.jstor.org/stable/40485014 <p>A procedure is outlined for distinguishing among competing hypotheses for fossil morphology and then used to evaluate current views on the meaning of Neandertal skeletal morphology. Three explanations have dominated debates about the meaning of Neandertal cranial features: climatic adaptation, anterior dental loading, and genetic drift. Neither climatic adaptation nor anterior dental loading are well supported, but genetic drift is consistent with the available evidence. Climatic adaptation and activity patterns are the most discussed explanations for Neandertal postcranial features. Robust empirical relationships between climate and body form in extant humans and other endotherms currently make climatic adaptation the most plausible explanation for the wide bodies and relatively short limbs of Neandertals, and many additional postcranial features are likely secondary consequences of these overall skeletal proportions. Activity patterns may explain certain Neandertal postcranial features, but unlike the situation for climate, relationships in extant humans between morphology and activities are typically not well established. For both the cranium and the postcranium, changes in diet or activity patterns may underlie why Neandertals and Pleistocene modern humans tend to be more robust than Holocene humans.</p> The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
spellingShingle Weaver, Timothy D., Klein, Richard G., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology, Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature
title The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology
title_full The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology
title_fullStr The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology
title_full_unstemmed The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology
title_short The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology
title_sort the meaning of neandertal skeletal morphology
title_unstemmed The Meaning of Neandertal Skeletal Morphology
topic Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/40485014