author_facet Hoffecker, John F.
Klein, Richard G.
Hoffecker, John F.
Klein, Richard G.
author Hoffecker, John F.
Klein, Richard G.
spellingShingle Hoffecker, John F.
Klein, Richard G.
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature
author_sort hoffecker, john f.
spelling Hoffecker, John F. Klein, Richard G. 0027-8424 National Academy of Sciences Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature https://www.jstor.org/stable/40485016 <p>The earliest credible evidence of Homo sapiens in Europe is an archaeological proxy in the form of several artifact assemblages (Bohunician) found in South-Central and possibly Eastern Europe, dating to ≤ 48,000 calibrated radiocarbon years before present (cal BP). They are similar to assemblages probably made by modern humans in the Levant (Emiran) at an earlier date and apparently represent a population movement into the Balkans during a warm climate interval [Greenland Interstadial 12 (Gl 12)]. A second population movement may be represented by a diverse set of artifact assemblages (sometimes termed Proto-Aurignacian) found in the Balkans, parts of Southwest Europe, and probably in Eastern Europe, and dating to several brief interstadials (Gl 11-Gl 9) that preceded the beginning of cold Heinrich Event 4 (HE4) (≈40,000 cal BP). They are similar to contemporaneous assemblages made by modern humans in the Levant (Ahmarian). The earliest known human skeletal remains in Europe that may be unequivocally assigned to H. sapiens (Peçstera eu Oase, Romania) date to this time period (≈42,000 cal BP) but are not associated with artifacts. After the Campanian Ignimbrite volcanic eruption (40,000 cal BP) and the beginning of HE4, artifact assemblages assigned to the classic Aurignacian, an industry associated with modern human skeletal remains that seems to have developed in Europe, spread throughout the continent.</p> The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
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title The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_unstemmed The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_full The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_fullStr The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_full_unstemmed The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_short The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_sort the spread of modern humans in europe
topic Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/40485016
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description <p>The earliest credible evidence of Homo sapiens in Europe is an archaeological proxy in the form of several artifact assemblages (Bohunician) found in South-Central and possibly Eastern Europe, dating to ≤ 48,000 calibrated radiocarbon years before present (cal BP). They are similar to assemblages probably made by modern humans in the Levant (Emiran) at an earlier date and apparently represent a population movement into the Balkans during a warm climate interval [Greenland Interstadial 12 (Gl 12)]. A second population movement may be represented by a diverse set of artifact assemblages (sometimes termed Proto-Aurignacian) found in the Balkans, parts of Southwest Europe, and probably in Eastern Europe, and dating to several brief interstadials (Gl 11-Gl 9) that preceded the beginning of cold Heinrich Event 4 (HE4) (≈40,000 cal BP). They are similar to contemporaneous assemblages made by modern humans in the Levant (Ahmarian). The earliest known human skeletal remains in Europe that may be unequivocally assigned to H. sapiens (Peçstera eu Oase, Romania) date to this time period (≈42,000 cal BP) but are not associated with artifacts. After the Campanian Ignimbrite volcanic eruption (40,000 cal BP) and the beginning of HE4, artifact assemblages assigned to the classic Aurignacian, an industry associated with modern human skeletal remains that seems to have developed in Europe, spread throughout the continent.</p>
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author Hoffecker, John F., Klein, Richard G.
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description <p>The earliest credible evidence of Homo sapiens in Europe is an archaeological proxy in the form of several artifact assemblages (Bohunician) found in South-Central and possibly Eastern Europe, dating to ≤ 48,000 calibrated radiocarbon years before present (cal BP). They are similar to assemblages probably made by modern humans in the Levant (Emiran) at an earlier date and apparently represent a population movement into the Balkans during a warm climate interval [Greenland Interstadial 12 (Gl 12)]. A second population movement may be represented by a diverse set of artifact assemblages (sometimes termed Proto-Aurignacian) found in the Balkans, parts of Southwest Europe, and probably in Eastern Europe, and dating to several brief interstadials (Gl 11-Gl 9) that preceded the beginning of cold Heinrich Event 4 (HE4) (≈40,000 cal BP). They are similar to contemporaneous assemblages made by modern humans in the Levant (Ahmarian). The earliest known human skeletal remains in Europe that may be unequivocally assigned to H. sapiens (Peçstera eu Oase, Romania) date to this time period (≈42,000 cal BP) but are not associated with artifacts. After the Campanian Ignimbrite volcanic eruption (40,000 cal BP) and the beginning of HE4, artifact assemblages assigned to the classic Aurignacian, an industry associated with modern human skeletal remains that seems to have developed in Europe, spread throughout the continent.</p>
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spelling Hoffecker, John F. Klein, Richard G. 0027-8424 National Academy of Sciences Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature https://www.jstor.org/stable/40485016 <p>The earliest credible evidence of Homo sapiens in Europe is an archaeological proxy in the form of several artifact assemblages (Bohunician) found in South-Central and possibly Eastern Europe, dating to ≤ 48,000 calibrated radiocarbon years before present (cal BP). They are similar to assemblages probably made by modern humans in the Levant (Emiran) at an earlier date and apparently represent a population movement into the Balkans during a warm climate interval [Greenland Interstadial 12 (Gl 12)]. A second population movement may be represented by a diverse set of artifact assemblages (sometimes termed Proto-Aurignacian) found in the Balkans, parts of Southwest Europe, and probably in Eastern Europe, and dating to several brief interstadials (Gl 11-Gl 9) that preceded the beginning of cold Heinrich Event 4 (HE4) (≈40,000 cal BP). They are similar to contemporaneous assemblages made by modern humans in the Levant (Ahmarian). The earliest known human skeletal remains in Europe that may be unequivocally assigned to H. sapiens (Peçstera eu Oase, Romania) date to this time period (≈42,000 cal BP) but are not associated with artifacts. After the Campanian Ignimbrite volcanic eruption (40,000 cal BP) and the beginning of HE4, artifact assemblages assigned to the classic Aurignacian, an industry associated with modern human skeletal remains that seems to have developed in Europe, spread throughout the continent.</p> The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
spellingShingle Hoffecker, John F., Klein, Richard G., Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe, Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature
title The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_full The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_fullStr The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_full_unstemmed The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_short The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
title_sort the spread of modern humans in europe
title_unstemmed The Spread of Modern Humans in Europe
topic Out of Africa: Modern Human Origins Special Feature
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/40485016