author_facet Yong, Wang
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author Yong, Wang
Finch, Deborah M.
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Finch, Deborah M.
The Wilson Bulletin
Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
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spelling Yong, Wang Finch, Deborah M. 0043-5643 Wilson Ornithological Society https://www.jstor.org/stable/4163809 <p>We studied timing, abundance, subspecies composition, fat stores, stopover length, and habitat use of Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) during spring and fall stopover along the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico. Spring migration started in mid-May and lasted about a month. Fall migration started in early-August and also lasted about a month. The most abundant subspecies was the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), followed by E. t. brewsteri, E. t. adastus, and E. t. traillii. Nearly half of the Willow Flycatchers captured had no observable fat. Spring flycatchers had more fat stores than fall flycatchers. Willow habitat had the highest capture rate among the habitats sampled. Willow Flycatchers caught in willow habitat had higher fat stores than those caught elsewhere. Recaptured Willow Flycatchers had an average body mass gain of 1.6%/day with a short stopover length. Most Willow Flycatchers were unable to reach their destinations in a single flight, making it necessary for them to replenish their energy stores elsewhere en route. We suggest that the riparian woodlands of the middle Rio Grande provide important refueling sites for stopover flycatchers as they migrate between their breeding and wintering grounds.</p> Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande The Wilson Bulletin
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author Yong, Wang, Finch, Deborah M.
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description <p>We studied timing, abundance, subspecies composition, fat stores, stopover length, and habitat use of Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) during spring and fall stopover along the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico. Spring migration started in mid-May and lasted about a month. Fall migration started in early-August and also lasted about a month. The most abundant subspecies was the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), followed by E. t. brewsteri, E. t. adastus, and E. t. traillii. Nearly half of the Willow Flycatchers captured had no observable fat. Spring flycatchers had more fat stores than fall flycatchers. Willow habitat had the highest capture rate among the habitats sampled. Willow Flycatchers caught in willow habitat had higher fat stores than those caught elsewhere. Recaptured Willow Flycatchers had an average body mass gain of 1.6%/day with a short stopover length. Most Willow Flycatchers were unable to reach their destinations in a single flight, making it necessary for them to replenish their energy stores elsewhere en route. We suggest that the riparian woodlands of the middle Rio Grande provide important refueling sites for stopover flycatchers as they migrate between their breeding and wintering grounds.</p>
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spelling Yong, Wang Finch, Deborah M. 0043-5643 Wilson Ornithological Society https://www.jstor.org/stable/4163809 <p>We studied timing, abundance, subspecies composition, fat stores, stopover length, and habitat use of Willow Flycatchers (Empidonax traillii) during spring and fall stopover along the Middle Rio Grande, New Mexico. Spring migration started in mid-May and lasted about a month. Fall migration started in early-August and also lasted about a month. The most abundant subspecies was the Southwestern Willow Flycatcher (E. t. extimus), followed by E. t. brewsteri, E. t. adastus, and E. t. traillii. Nearly half of the Willow Flycatchers captured had no observable fat. Spring flycatchers had more fat stores than fall flycatchers. Willow habitat had the highest capture rate among the habitats sampled. Willow Flycatchers caught in willow habitat had higher fat stores than those caught elsewhere. Recaptured Willow Flycatchers had an average body mass gain of 1.6%/day with a short stopover length. Most Willow Flycatchers were unable to reach their destinations in a single flight, making it necessary for them to replenish their energy stores elsewhere en route. We suggest that the riparian woodlands of the middle Rio Grande provide important refueling sites for stopover flycatchers as they migrate between their breeding and wintering grounds.</p> Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande The Wilson Bulletin
spellingShingle Yong, Wang, Finch, Deborah M., The Wilson Bulletin, Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
title Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
title_full Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
title_fullStr Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
title_full_unstemmed Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
title_short Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
title_sort migration of the willow flycatcher along the middle rio grande
title_unstemmed Migration of the Willow Flycatcher along the Middle Rio Grande
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/4163809