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rft.atitle High‐Resolution Analysis of δ<sup>18</sup>O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
rft.epage 453
rft.genre article
rft.issn 0022-1376
1537-5269
rft.issue 4
rft.jtitle The Journal of Geology
rft.tpages 12
rft.pages 441-453
rft.pub The University of Chicago Press
rft.date 2003-07-01
x.date 2003-07-01T00:00:00Z
rft.spage 441
rft.volume 111
abstract <label>Abstract</label> <p>Laser ablation and silver phosphate procedures were used to measure the oxygen isotope composition in organophosphatic shells of lingulid brachiopods at a variety of scales: within valves, between valves from the same individual, between individuals collected at the same location at the same time, between localities, and between modern and fossil specimens. Specimens included modern lingulids from several patches in the northern Gulf of California (Mexico) and the Gulf of Nicoya (Costa Rica), and fossil specimens from the lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation. All specimens display a high degree of intrashell variability, frequently exceeding 4‰. This variability is not symmetrical within the shell, does not appear to reflect growth bands, and is not consistent with a published lingulid phosphate‐oxygen isotope thermometer. Shells analyzed using silver phosphate preparations have variability similar (&gt;3.5‰) to that of shells analyzed using the laser ablation technique, ruling out the influence of organic carbon contamination. We interpret this variation as primary, representing a vital effect, possibly the result of enzymatic fractionation near mantle canals and muscle scars or in vivo mineralogical changes in shell composition. In contrast, oxygen isotope analysis of carbonate from these shells is repeatable and appears to represent equilibrium values. Although oxygen isotope analyses from laser ablation and silver phosphate methods indicate that the phosphate in lingulid valves is an unreliable recorder of oxygen isotope ratios in seawater, it may be possible to derive paleoclimate data from the carbonate fraction.</p>
authors Array ( [rft.aulast] => Rodland [rft.aufirst] => David L. )
Array ( [rft.aulast] => Kowalewski [rft.aufirst] => Michał )
Array ( [rft.aulast] => Dettman [rft.aufirst] => David L. )
Array ( [rft.aulast] => Flessa [rft.aufirst] => Karl W. )
Array ( [rft.aulast] => Atudorei [rft.aufirst] => Viorel )
Array ( [rft.aulast] => Sharp [rft.aufirst] => Zachary D. )
doi 10.1086/375283
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url https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/375283
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author Rodland, David L., Kowalewski, Michał, Dettman, David L., Flessa, Karl W., Atudorei, Viorel, Sharp, Zachary D.
author_facet Rodland, David L., Kowalewski, Michał, Dettman, David L., Flessa, Karl W., Atudorei, Viorel, Sharp, Zachary D., Rodland, David L., Kowalewski, Michał, Dettman, David L., Flessa, Karl W., Atudorei, Viorel, Sharp, Zachary D.
author_sort rodland, david l.
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container_title The Journal of Geology
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description <label>Abstract</label> <p>Laser ablation and silver phosphate procedures were used to measure the oxygen isotope composition in organophosphatic shells of lingulid brachiopods at a variety of scales: within valves, between valves from the same individual, between individuals collected at the same location at the same time, between localities, and between modern and fossil specimens. Specimens included modern lingulids from several patches in the northern Gulf of California (Mexico) and the Gulf of Nicoya (Costa Rica), and fossil specimens from the lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation. All specimens display a high degree of intrashell variability, frequently exceeding 4‰. This variability is not symmetrical within the shell, does not appear to reflect growth bands, and is not consistent with a published lingulid phosphate‐oxygen isotope thermometer. Shells analyzed using silver phosphate preparations have variability similar (&gt;3.5‰) to that of shells analyzed using the laser ablation technique, ruling out the influence of organic carbon contamination. We interpret this variation as primary, representing a vital effect, possibly the result of enzymatic fractionation near mantle canals and muscle scars or in vivo mineralogical changes in shell composition. In contrast, oxygen isotope analysis of carbonate from these shells is repeatable and appears to represent equilibrium values. Although oxygen isotope analyses from laser ablation and silver phosphate methods indicate that the phosphate in lingulid valves is an unreliable recorder of oxygen isotope ratios in seawater, it may be possible to derive paleoclimate data from the carbonate fraction.</p>
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imprint The University of Chicago Press, 2003
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spelling Rodland, David L. Kowalewski, Michał Dettman, David L. Flessa, Karl W. Atudorei, Viorel Sharp, Zachary D. 0022-1376 1537-5269 The University of Chicago Press https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/375283 <label>Abstract</label> <p>Laser ablation and silver phosphate procedures were used to measure the oxygen isotope composition in organophosphatic shells of lingulid brachiopods at a variety of scales: within valves, between valves from the same individual, between individuals collected at the same location at the same time, between localities, and between modern and fossil specimens. Specimens included modern lingulids from several patches in the northern Gulf of California (Mexico) and the Gulf of Nicoya (Costa Rica), and fossil specimens from the lower Triassic Dinwoody Formation. All specimens display a high degree of intrashell variability, frequently exceeding 4‰. This variability is not symmetrical within the shell, does not appear to reflect growth bands, and is not consistent with a published lingulid phosphate‐oxygen isotope thermometer. Shells analyzed using silver phosphate preparations have variability similar (&gt;3.5‰) to that of shells analyzed using the laser ablation technique, ruling out the influence of organic carbon contamination. We interpret this variation as primary, representing a vital effect, possibly the result of enzymatic fractionation near mantle canals and muscle scars or in vivo mineralogical changes in shell composition. In contrast, oxygen isotope analysis of carbonate from these shells is repeatable and appears to represent equilibrium values. Although oxygen isotope analyses from laser ablation and silver phosphate methods indicate that the phosphate in lingulid valves is an unreliable recorder of oxygen isotope ratios in seawater, it may be possible to derive paleoclimate data from the carbonate fraction.</p> High‐Resolution Analysis of δ<sup>18</sup>O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods The Journal of Geology
spellingShingle Rodland, David L., Kowalewski, Michał, Dettman, David L., Flessa, Karl W., Atudorei, Viorel, Sharp, Zachary D., The Journal of Geology, High‐Resolution Analysis of δ18O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
title High‐Resolution Analysis of δ18O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
title_full High‐Resolution Analysis of δ18O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
title_fullStr High‐Resolution Analysis of δ18O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
title_full_unstemmed High‐Resolution Analysis of δ18O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
title_short High‐Resolution Analysis of δ18O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
title_sort high‐resolution analysis of δ<sup>18</sup>o in the biogenic phosphate of modern and fossil lingulid brachiopods
title_unstemmed High‐Resolution Analysis of δ18O in the Biogenic Phosphate of Modern and Fossil Lingulid Brachiopods
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1086/375283, https://doi.org/10.1086/375283