author_facet Krell, Frank-Thorsten
Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia
Weiß, Ingo
Eggleton, Paul
Linsenmair, Karl Eduard
Krell, Frank-Thorsten
Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia
Weiß, Ingo
Eggleton, Paul
Linsenmair, Karl Eduard
author Krell, Frank-Thorsten
Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia
Weiß, Ingo
Eggleton, Paul
Linsenmair, Karl Eduard
spellingShingle Krell, Frank-Thorsten
Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia
Weiß, Ingo
Eggleton, Paul
Linsenmair, Karl Eduard
Ecography
Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
author_sort krell, frank-thorsten
spelling Krell, Frank-Thorsten Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia Weiß, Ingo Eggleton, Paul Linsenmair, Karl Eduard 0906-7590 1600-0587 Blackwell Publishers https://www.jstor.org/stable/3683436 <p> In the forest-savanna mosaic of Côte d'Ivoire (Parc National de la Comoé), we studied the guild structure of dung beetle assemblages of fresh buffalo faeces (60 samples, 19626 specimens) in three adjacent habitats: savanna parkland, gallery forest, grassland of the river valley. We found clear patterns at the guild level determined by the habitat type and time of day: in the savanna parkland during the day, telecoprids (rollers) and their kleptoparasites are dominant. At night, paracoprids (tunnelers) and endocoprids (dwellers) dominate the dung beetle assemblages. In the river valley during the day and the gallery forest all day and night, the abundance of dung beetles is very low and does not reach a competitive level. In the river valley at night, endocoprids are quite abundant. Abundances of kleptoparasites and their hosts are positively correlated. The telecoprids are the most competitively superior guild since they use the resource most rapidly, but their abundance is correlated with temperature of faeces and soil. This is probably because their mode of resource utilization is energetically costly, so they require higher temperatures in order to maximize their competitiveness. Their ecological tolerance is therefore narrow and they are only present in the savanna parkland during the day. The endocoprids are the least competitive guild, since they do not relocate the resource and so are not able to monopolize parts of it. However, their mode of resource utilization is less energetically costly. They seem to be more tolerant of temperature fluctuation and more able to cross barriers such as the gallery forest. Spatial separation of Afrotropical dung beetle guilds is likely to be due to a trade-off between competitive superiority and energetic constraints. </p> Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Ecography
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title Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_unstemmed Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_full Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_fullStr Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_full_unstemmed Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_short Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_sort spatial separation of afrotropical dung beetle guilds: a trade-off between competitive superiority and energetic constraints (coleoptera: scarabaeidae)
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/3683436
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description <p> In the forest-savanna mosaic of Côte d'Ivoire (Parc National de la Comoé), we studied the guild structure of dung beetle assemblages of fresh buffalo faeces (60 samples, 19626 specimens) in three adjacent habitats: savanna parkland, gallery forest, grassland of the river valley. We found clear patterns at the guild level determined by the habitat type and time of day: in the savanna parkland during the day, telecoprids (rollers) and their kleptoparasites are dominant. At night, paracoprids (tunnelers) and endocoprids (dwellers) dominate the dung beetle assemblages. In the river valley during the day and the gallery forest all day and night, the abundance of dung beetles is very low and does not reach a competitive level. In the river valley at night, endocoprids are quite abundant. Abundances of kleptoparasites and their hosts are positively correlated. The telecoprids are the most competitively superior guild since they use the resource most rapidly, but their abundance is correlated with temperature of faeces and soil. This is probably because their mode of resource utilization is energetically costly, so they require higher temperatures in order to maximize their competitiveness. Their ecological tolerance is therefore narrow and they are only present in the savanna parkland during the day. The endocoprids are the least competitive guild, since they do not relocate the resource and so are not able to monopolize parts of it. However, their mode of resource utilization is less energetically costly. They seem to be more tolerant of temperature fluctuation and more able to cross barriers such as the gallery forest. Spatial separation of Afrotropical dung beetle guilds is likely to be due to a trade-off between competitive superiority and energetic constraints. </p>
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author Krell, Frank-Thorsten, Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia, Weiß, Ingo, Eggleton, Paul, Linsenmair, Karl Eduard
author_facet Krell, Frank-Thorsten, Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia, Weiß, Ingo, Eggleton, Paul, Linsenmair, Karl Eduard, Krell, Frank-Thorsten, Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia, Weiß, Ingo, Eggleton, Paul, Linsenmair, Karl Eduard
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description <p> In the forest-savanna mosaic of Côte d'Ivoire (Parc National de la Comoé), we studied the guild structure of dung beetle assemblages of fresh buffalo faeces (60 samples, 19626 specimens) in three adjacent habitats: savanna parkland, gallery forest, grassland of the river valley. We found clear patterns at the guild level determined by the habitat type and time of day: in the savanna parkland during the day, telecoprids (rollers) and their kleptoparasites are dominant. At night, paracoprids (tunnelers) and endocoprids (dwellers) dominate the dung beetle assemblages. In the river valley during the day and the gallery forest all day and night, the abundance of dung beetles is very low and does not reach a competitive level. In the river valley at night, endocoprids are quite abundant. Abundances of kleptoparasites and their hosts are positively correlated. The telecoprids are the most competitively superior guild since they use the resource most rapidly, but their abundance is correlated with temperature of faeces and soil. This is probably because their mode of resource utilization is energetically costly, so they require higher temperatures in order to maximize their competitiveness. Their ecological tolerance is therefore narrow and they are only present in the savanna parkland during the day. The endocoprids are the least competitive guild, since they do not relocate the resource and so are not able to monopolize parts of it. However, their mode of resource utilization is less energetically costly. They seem to be more tolerant of temperature fluctuation and more able to cross barriers such as the gallery forest. Spatial separation of Afrotropical dung beetle guilds is likely to be due to a trade-off between competitive superiority and energetic constraints. </p>
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spelling Krell, Frank-Thorsten Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia Weiß, Ingo Eggleton, Paul Linsenmair, Karl Eduard 0906-7590 1600-0587 Blackwell Publishers https://www.jstor.org/stable/3683436 <p> In the forest-savanna mosaic of Côte d'Ivoire (Parc National de la Comoé), we studied the guild structure of dung beetle assemblages of fresh buffalo faeces (60 samples, 19626 specimens) in three adjacent habitats: savanna parkland, gallery forest, grassland of the river valley. We found clear patterns at the guild level determined by the habitat type and time of day: in the savanna parkland during the day, telecoprids (rollers) and their kleptoparasites are dominant. At night, paracoprids (tunnelers) and endocoprids (dwellers) dominate the dung beetle assemblages. In the river valley during the day and the gallery forest all day and night, the abundance of dung beetles is very low and does not reach a competitive level. In the river valley at night, endocoprids are quite abundant. Abundances of kleptoparasites and their hosts are positively correlated. The telecoprids are the most competitively superior guild since they use the resource most rapidly, but their abundance is correlated with temperature of faeces and soil. This is probably because their mode of resource utilization is energetically costly, so they require higher temperatures in order to maximize their competitiveness. Their ecological tolerance is therefore narrow and they are only present in the savanna parkland during the day. The endocoprids are the least competitive guild, since they do not relocate the resource and so are not able to monopolize parts of it. However, their mode of resource utilization is less energetically costly. They seem to be more tolerant of temperature fluctuation and more able to cross barriers such as the gallery forest. Spatial separation of Afrotropical dung beetle guilds is likely to be due to a trade-off between competitive superiority and energetic constraints. </p> Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae) Ecography
spellingShingle Krell, Frank-Thorsten, Krell-Westerwalbesloh, Sylvia, Weiß, Ingo, Eggleton, Paul, Linsenmair, Karl Eduard, Ecography, Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_full Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_fullStr Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_full_unstemmed Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_short Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
title_sort spatial separation of afrotropical dung beetle guilds: a trade-off between competitive superiority and energetic constraints (coleoptera: scarabaeidae)
title_unstemmed Spatial Separation of Afrotropical Dung Beetle Guilds: A Trade-Off between Competitive Superiority and Energetic Constraints (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae)
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/3683436