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Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith

Bibliographic Details
Journal Title: Rhetoric Society Quarterly
Authors and Corporations: Miller, Thomas
In: Rhetoric Society Quarterly, 31, 2001, 3, p. 105-117
Type of Resource: E-Article
Language: English
published:
Rhetoric Society of America
Subjects:
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rft.atitle Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith
rft.epage 117
rft.genre article
rft.issn 0277-3945
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rft.jtitle Rhetoric Society Quarterly
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rft.pub Rhetoric Society of America
rft.date 2001-07-01
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rft.spage 105
rft.volume 31
abstract <p>Balancing the critiques of scientism in communications, this response notes how belletrism has marginalized rhetorical studies on the other side of the modern opposition of the arts and sciences. Such institutional divisions need to be assessed against broader changes in literacy if our disciplinary histories are to be a resource for assessing how rhetoricians in composition and communications can work together. The marginal positions of composition and speech courses may undermine the prestige of rhetoric as an academic discipline, but the margins can be a place of power if approached pragmatically. Looking beyond the pragmatic professionalism of disciplinary insiders such as Stanley Fish, we need to develop alliances with practitioners of the arts of rhetoric outside as well as within the academy if pragmatism is to contribute to the institutional work of making universities into institutions of public learning.</p>
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url https://www.jstor.org/stable/3886045
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description <p>Balancing the critiques of scientism in communications, this response notes how belletrism has marginalized rhetorical studies on the other side of the modern opposition of the arts and sciences. Such institutional divisions need to be assessed against broader changes in literacy if our disciplinary histories are to be a resource for assessing how rhetoricians in composition and communications can work together. The marginal positions of composition and speech courses may undermine the prestige of rhetoric as an academic discipline, but the margins can be a place of power if approached pragmatically. Looking beyond the pragmatic professionalism of disciplinary insiders such as Stanley Fish, we need to develop alliances with practitioners of the arts of rhetoric outside as well as within the academy if pragmatism is to contribute to the institutional work of making universities into institutions of public learning.</p>
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spelling Miller, Thomas 0277-3945 Rhetoric Society of America Rhetorical Paths in English and Communication Studies https://www.jstor.org/stable/3886045 <p>Balancing the critiques of scientism in communications, this response notes how belletrism has marginalized rhetorical studies on the other side of the modern opposition of the arts and sciences. Such institutional divisions need to be assessed against broader changes in literacy if our disciplinary histories are to be a resource for assessing how rhetoricians in composition and communications can work together. The marginal positions of composition and speech courses may undermine the prestige of rhetoric as an academic discipline, but the margins can be a place of power if approached pragmatically. Looking beyond the pragmatic professionalism of disciplinary insiders such as Stanley Fish, we need to develop alliances with practitioners of the arts of rhetoric outside as well as within the academy if pragmatism is to contribute to the institutional work of making universities into institutions of public learning.</p> Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith Rhetoric Society Quarterly
spellingShingle Miller, Thomas, Rhetoric Society Quarterly, Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith, Rhetorical Paths in English and Communication Studies
title Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith
title_full Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith
title_fullStr Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith
title_full_unstemmed Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith
title_short Disciplinary Identifications/Public Identities: A Response to Mailloux, Leff, and Keith
title_sort disciplinary identifications/public identities: a response to mailloux, leff, and keith
topic Rhetorical Paths in English and Communication Studies
url https://www.jstor.org/stable/3886045